Papua New Guinea

Papua New Guinea new sig/date (2014) 100-kina notes confirmed

Papua_New_Guinea_BPNG_100_kina_2014.00.00_B39c_P33_AC_14_223998_sig
100 kina, (20)14. Like BPNG B39, but new date and new signatures.

Anyone interested in buying one of these notes can contact the contributor by clicking the link below.

Courtesy of Stane Štraus (Polymer Bank Notes of the World).

Papua New Guinea new date (2014) 2-kina notes confirmed

2 kina, (20)14. Like BPNG B34, but new date.

Anyone interested in buying one of these notes can contact the contributor by clicking the link below.

Courtesy of Stane Štraus (Polymer Bank Notes of the World).

Papua New Guinea new 2- and 100-kina commemorative notes confirmed

Papua_New_Guinea_BPNG_2_kina_2013.00.00_B50a_PNL_CO_40294654_f
Papua_New_Guinea_BPNG_2_kina_2013.00.00_B50a_PNL_CO_40294654_r
BPNG B50 (PNL): 2 kina (US$0.85)
Green. Front: Coat of arms with bird of paradise perched on Kundu drum and ceremonial spear; National Parliament building in Port Moresby; 40th anniversary logo. Back: Mount Hagan axe; Kula arm band from Milne Bay Province; engraved dogs’ tooth necklace from Bougainville; Sepik clay pot; tapa cloth patterns. No security thread. Watermark: Bank logo. Printer: (NPA). 140 x 70 mm. Polymer.
a. (20)13. Signature 11. Intro: 04.11.2013.

Papua_New_Guinea_BPNG_100_kina_2013.00.00_B51a_PNL_CC_40106138_f
Papua_New_Guinea_BPNG_100_kina_2013.00.00_B51a_PNL_CC_40106138_r
BPNG B51 (PNL): 100 kina (US$42)
Green and gold. Front: Coat of arms with bird of paradise perched on Kundu drum and ceremonial spear; National Parliament building in Port Moresby; 40th anniversary logo. Back: Coffee beans; cardamom seeds; coconut palm tree; fish; timber; cargo ship; oil rig; bird; jumbo jet; dump truck; microwave tower. No security thread. Watermark: Bank logo. Printer: (NPA). 150 x 75 mm. Polymer.
a. (20)13. Signature 11. Intro: 04.11.2013.

Anyone interested in buying one of these notes can contact the contributor by clicking the link below.

Courtesy of Hartmut Fraunhoffer (www.banknoten.de).

Papua New Guinea new 2- and 100-kina commemorative notes reported


According to an article on EMTV.com, on 4 November 2013 the Bank of Papua New Guinea will issue commemorative 2- and 100-kina polymer notes like the existing regular issues (BPNG B34 and B49, respectively), but with 40th anniversary logos overprinted on front.

Courtesy of Thomas Krause.

Papua New Guinea new sig 10-kina note confirmed

Papua_New_Guinea_BPNG_10_kina_1985.04.01_B10e_P9_NEA_305017_sig
10 kina, no date. Like BPNG B10d, but new signatures.

Courtesy of Don Ludwig.

Papua New Guinea demonetizes paper notes as of 30.06.2013

According to an undated article on Islands Business, "all paper banknotes in circulation in the country will be withdrawn by the Bank of Papua New Guinea by June 2013, after which they will not be accepted as legal tender." Polymer notes remain legal tender.

Papua New Guinea new sig/date (2012) 50-kina note confirmed

Papua_New_Guinea_BPNG_50_K_2012.00.00_B38b_P32_AA_12_000001_sig
50 kina (US$25), (20)12. Like BPNG B38 (P32), but new date and new signatures (Loi Martin Bakani and Simon Tosali).

Courtesy of Stane Štraus (Polymer Bank Notes of the World).

Papua New Guinea new sig/date 100-kina note confirmed


100 kina (US$42), (20)12. Like BPNG B48, but without the 35th anniversary overprint, plus new date and signatures (Loi Martin Bakani and Simon Tosali).

Courtesy of Stane Štraus.

Papua New Guinea chapter of The Banknote Book is now available

Papua New Guinea

The Papua New Guinea chapter of The Banknote Book is now available for individual sale at US$9.99, and as a free download to subscribers.

This 18-page catalog covers every note (114 types and varieties, including 34 notes unlisted in the SCWPM) issued by the Bank of Papua New Guinea from 1975 to present day. Revised 4 September 2012.

Each chapter of The Banknote Book includes detailed descriptions and background information, full-color images, and accurate valuations. The Banknote Book also features:
  • Sharp color images of note’s front and back without overlap
  • Face value or date of demonetization if no longer legal tender
  • Specific identification of all vignette elements
  • Security features described in full
  • Printer imprint reproduced exactly as on note
  • Each date/signature variety assigned an individual letter
  • Variety checkboxes for tracking your collection and want list
  • Red stars highlight the many notes missing from the SCWPM
  • Date reproduced exactly as on note
  • Precise date of introduction noted when known
  • Replacement note information
  • Signature tables, often with names and terms of service
  • Background information for historical and cultural context
  • Details magnified to distinguish between note varieties
  • Bibliographic sources listed for further research

Subscribe to The Banknote Book
If you collect the entire world or a large number of countries, buying a $99 annual subscription is the best deal because it's less expensive than buying chapters individually, and it entitles you to every chapter currently available as well as everything published—or revised (click here to see the Change Log)—during the next 12 months.

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“Sign

Papua New Guinea new 35th anniversary commemoratives confirmed


All notes are dated (20)10 and signed by Leonard Wilson Kamit and Simon Tosali.



On 15 September 2010 the Bank of Papua New Guinea introduced new polymer notes to commemorate the nation’s 35th anniversary of independence from Australia. All six denominations (2, 5, 10, 20, 50, and 100 kina) have been issued and are like the preceding issues but they have a logo with the text “35th Anniversary 1975 – 2010.” In addition to the notes issued for circulation, the bank is also selling a numismatic product consisting of an album with all the notes with low and matching serial numbers.

Anyone interested in buying one of these notes can contact the contributor by clicking the link below. Be sure to say you saw it mentioned here on Banknotenews.com.

Courtesy of Andrew Quirke, Sean Rooney, Manfred Krüger, and Thomas Krause.

Papua New Guinea new date (2009) 5-kina note confirmed


5 kina (US$1.80), (20)09. Like Pick 29, but new date.

Courtesy of Leszek Porowski.

Papua New Guinea issues commemorative 20- and 100-kina notes

On April 22, 2009, the governor of the Bank of Papua New Guinea, Wilson Kamit, gave the following speech concerning the issue of commemorative 20-kina and 100-kina banknotes, which became legal tender the following day:

“Members of the Board, invited guests, staff and management of the Bank of PNG, media representatives, ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the release of the our new K20 and K100 paper banknotes commemorating the 2009 KINA & TOEA DAY which is on 19 April 2009. This day unfortunately falls on the weekend this year so we decided to celebrate it today.

Ladies and gentlemen, when we introduced our own currency in 1975, it was one of the many steps of nation building, just like introducing our own national flag, national anthem and international institutions such as the Bank of PNG. The first issue of banknotes was in three denominations, namely the 2 Kina, 5 Kina and 10 Kina notes. The 20 Kina banknote was introduced three years later in 1978, followed by the 50 Kina banknote in 1989 and the 100 Kina note in 2005. Initially, apart from the 100 Kina banknote, all these denominations were in paper substrate.

Our currency has evolved over the 34 years, keeping abreast of the growth and development of the country, the monetization within the economy, changes in the technology of producing currency and the economics (cost) of producing coins and banknotes. You would no doubt have noticed that we have converted our banknotes from paper to polymer substrate as a result of advancement in security and technologies for printing banknotes. This however does not stop us from issuing paper banknotes as well because the technology for paper substrate has evolved with advanced security features as we shall see on our new K100 banknote.

In 2005 we commenced a review of our family of currency. The Bank introduced the K100 as the highest denomination in the family of banknotes, and reduced the size of the K1 coin. The larger sized K1 coin is being gradually withdrawn from circulation. We also demonetized the one and two toea copper coins. Last year, we introduced the new K2 coin which is being used alongside the K2 banknote. Given the frequent usage with the resultant wear and tear of the K2 banknote, we will assess the usage of the K2 coin before deciding on its future.

For the banknotes, we standardized the main theme on all the new series to show the National Parliament House on the front which emphasized Nation building and Nationhood. The images of the Parliament House on each of the banknotes are taken at different angles to make each note unique and different. On the back of the notes, we retained the original designs of traditional forms of money used in different parts of Papua New Guinea.

There are advanced security features incorporated in all these new series of banknotes to protect against counterfeiting. To date, we have not experience any major counterfeiting in our banknotes but it is worthy to take preventive action than to be sorry after.
As I have mentioned during previous releases of our various currencies, Papua New Guinea is predominantly a cash-based economy, where the majority of our people continue to use cash (coins and banknotes) as the main form of payment in settling their transactions. We will therefore ensure an acceptable quality of banknotes with longevity, given our humid, tropical climate and the frequent and rough handling of currency by the public.

The Bank has engaged De La Rue Currency to produce these two commemorative paper banknotes. As a risk management strategy, we have the option to use them should the supplier of our polymer (plastic) banknotes be unable to produce our banknotes. De La Rue has developed a more advanced security feature called the Optiks security thread, which can be seen through the aperture at the front of the new K100 note, making it difficult to produce counterfeits. It is also prudent to have an alternative supplier so that we can optimize on the price quality and swiftness of delivery of orders from our suppliers.”



20 kina (US$7.60)
Red-brown. Front: 35th anniversary logo; coat of arms with bird of paradise perched on Kundu drum and ceremonial spear; National Parliament building in Port Moresby. Back: boar head; toea (cowrie shell) necklace from Madang; Toa armband from Central Province; shell ornament from Western Province; tapa cloth patterns. Windowed security thread with demetalized BPNG. Watermark: Bank logo, electrotype BPNG, and Cornerstones. Printer: TDLR (w/o imprint). 150 x 75 mm. No date. Signature 11. Introduced 04.23.2009.



100 kina (US$38)
Green and gold. Front: 35th anniversary logo; coat of arms with bird of paradise perched on Kundu drum and ceremonial spear; National Parliament building in Port Moresby. Back: Palm tree; cowrie shells; fish; timber; cargo ship; oil rig; bird; jumbo jet; dump truck; microwave tower. Optiks security thread with demetalized BPNG 100. Watermark: Bank logo and Cornerstones. Printer: TDLR (w/o imprint). 150 x 75 mm. No date. Signature 11. Introduced 04.23.2009.

Courtesy of Don Cleveland and Thomas Krause.

Papua New Guinea 2003 commemorative confirmed



Based upon the 1973-2003 golden logo overprint in the lower right front, this paper 5-kina note from Papua New Guinea was apparently issued to commemorate the 30th anniversary of the founding of the Bank of Papua New Guinea. The serial number prefix LWK are the initials of Leonard Wilson Kamit, governor of the bank since 1999.

Courtesy of David White.

Papua New Guinea issues new 2- and 50-kina notes



2 kina
Green. Front: Coat of arms with bird of paradise with drum and spear; Parliament building in Port Moresby; BPNG logo. Back: Mount Hagan axe; Kula arm band from Milne Bay Province; engraved dogs’ tooth necklace from Bougainville; Sepik clay pot; tapa cloth patterns. No security thread. Watermark: BPNG logo. Printer: NPA (w/o imprint). 140 x 70 mm. Polymer. (20)08. Signature unknown. Introduced 31.10.2008.



50 kina
Orange. Front: Coat of arms with bird of paradise with drum and spear; Parliament building in Port Moresby. Back: Prime Minister Michael Somare; spears from Sepik; shield and mask from New Ireland; leaf and pointed Tubuan face mas from New Briton; headdress from the Highlands; mask and costume from Sepik River. No security thread. Watermark: BPNG logo. Printer: NPA (w/o imprint). 150 x 75 mm. Polymer. (20)08. Signature unknown. Introduced 31.10.2008.

Courtesy of Kee Hong Boon (Tigerson) and Kai Hwong.

Papua New Guinea issues new 10-kina polymer note



10 kina (US$3.60), (20)08. Introduced 18.04.2008. National Parliament and national crest on front. Tami bowl, bird of paradise feathers, a boar’s tusk from the Highlands, and Tambu shell money from East New Britain on back. Intaglio printing, clear window with 10 embossed, shadow image of bank logo, G-Switch, iridescent bird of paradise, signatures (Leonard Wilson Kamit, GOVERNOR; Simon Tossali, SECRETARY) and serial number fluoresce yellow/green under UV light. Polymer. Printer: Note Printing Australia (w/o imprint).

Papua New Guinea issues new 5-kina polymer note



5 kina (US$1.80), (20)08. Introduced 18.04.2008. National Parliament and national crest on front. Hombuli mask from Sepik, kina shell necklace, and shell necklace from New Ireland Province on back. Intaglio printing, clear window with 5 embossed, shadow image of bank logo, G-Switch, iridescent bird of paradise, signatures (Leonard Wilson Kamit, GOVERNOR; Simon Tossali, SECRETARY) and serial number fluoresce yellow/green under UV light. Polymer. Printer: Note Printing Australia (w/o imprint).

Papua New Guinea issues new polymer 20-kina note



20 kina (US$7.25), (20)07. Issued November 5, 2007. Parliament House and national crest (a stylised bird of paradise sitting on a kundu [drum] and a spear) as G-Switch. Boar’s head, toea arm band from the Central Province, a cowrie shell necklace from Madang, and a shell ornament from the Western Province on back. Intaglio printing, 20 embossed on see-through window, bank logo as latent image, black serial numbers and signatures (L. Wilson Kamit, GOVERNOR; Simon Tosali, SECRETARY DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY) flouresce yellow/green under UV light, iridescent bird of paradise on back. Polymer.

Papua New Guinea issues 10-kina note with 8-digit serial number


10 kina (US$3.30), ND. Like Pick 26 (above, bottom), but serial number has eight—not six—digits, uses different font, and is positioned different.

Courtesy of Menelaos Stamatelos, Southeastern Numismatics.

Papua New Guinea issues revised 20-kina note polymer


20 kina (US$6.60), ND (2006). Like Pick 27, but without commemorative logo at left, and new signatures (Leonard Wilson Kamit, Governor; Simon Tossali, Secretary). Polymer.

Courtesy of Thomas Krause.

Papua New Guinea issues new 2-kina polymer note


2 kina (US$0.68), (20)07. Green, yellow, and light blue. National Parliament building, two see-through windows, and signatures (L. Wilson Kamit, GOVERNOR; Simon Tosali, SECRETARY DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY). Back like Pick 21, though slightly redesigned. Polymer.

Anyone interested in buying this note can contact the contributor by clicking the link below. Be sure to say you saw it mentioned here on Banknotenews.com.

Courtesy of Chris Twining.

Papua New Guinea issues new date (2007) 20-kina note


20 kina (US$6.90), (20)07. Like SCWPM 27, but no anniversary logo, new date, and new signatures (Leonard Wilson Kamit, GOVERNOR; Simon Tossali, SECRETARY DEPARTMENT OF TREASURY). Polymer.

Courtesy of Thomas Krause.