Cuba new date (2013) 1-peso convertible note confirmed

1 peso convertible, 2013. Like PFX46, but new date.

Courtesy of Yigal Arkin.

Cuba new date (2008) 100-peso note confirmed

100 pesos, 2008. Like BCC B12, but new date.

Courtesy of Yigal Arkin.

Cuba new date (2012) 10-peso note confirmed

10 pesos, 2012. Like BCC B6, but new date.

Courtesy of Yigal Arkin.

Cuba new date (2007) 100-peso note confirmed

100 pesos, 2007. Like BCC B12b, but new date.

Courtesy of Ricardo G. Ramírez.

Cuba new date (2013) 20-peso note confirmed

20 pesos, 2013. Like BCC B8g, but new date.

Courtesy of Ricardo G. Ramírez.

Cuba to scrap two-currency system

According to a BBC article dated 22 October 2013, Cuba intends to reform its financial sector, doing away with the two-currency system wherein the convertible peso (CUC) used by tourists is pegged to the US dollar and the regular peso (CUP) used by Cubans is worth considerably less. The council of ministers has not said when the change would be implemented, though some Cuban economists are predicting within the next 18 months.

Courtesy of Jim "Rubycored" Chen.

Cuba new date (2011) 10-peso note confirmed

10 pesos, 2011. Like BCC B6l, but new date. Signature Ernesto Medina Villaveirán, prefix DM.

Courtesy of Thomas Augustsson.

Cuba chapter of The Banknote Book is now available

Cuba cover
The Cuba chapter of The Banknote Book is now available for individual sale at US$9.99, and as a free download to subscribers.

This 18-page catalog covers notes issued by Banco Nacional de Cuba (National Bank of Cuba) from 1949 to 1995, and Banco Central de Cuba (Central Bank of Cuba) from 1997 to present day. This chapter does not yet cover foreign exchange certificates. Published 21 June 2013.

Each chapter of The Banknote Book includes detailed descriptions and background information, full-color images, and accurate valuations. The Banknote Book also features:
  • Sharp color images of note’s front and back without overlap
  • Face value or date of demonetization if no longer legal tender
  • Specific identification of all vignette elements
  • Security features described in full
  • Printer imprint reproduced exactly as on note
  • Each date/signature variety assigned an individual letter
  • Variety checkboxes for tracking your collection and want list
  • Date reproduced exactly as on note
  • Precise date of introduction noted when known
  • Replacement note information
  • Signature tables, often with names and terms of service
  • Background information for historical and cultural context
  • Details magnified to distinguish between note varieties
  • Bibliographic sources listed for further research

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If you collect the entire world or a large number of countries, buying a $99 annual subscription is the best deal because it's less expensive than buying chapters individually, and it entitles you to every chapter currently available as well as everything published—or revised (click here to see the Change Log)—during the next 12 months.

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Cuba new date (2013) 50-peso note confirmed

50 pesos, 2013. Like P123, but new date.

Courtesy of Raul Perez-Alejo Neyra.

Cuba new date (2013) 50-peso note confirmed

50 pesos, 2013. Like P123, but new date.

Courtesy of Raul Perez-Alejo Neyra.

Cuba new sig/date (2012) 50-peso note confirmed

Cuba_BCC_50_P_2012.00.00_P123_BJ-23_156015_sig
50 pesos (US$50), 2012. Like P123, but new signature and date. Series BJ.

Courtesy of Thomas Augustsson.

Cuba new sig/date (2011) 50-peso convertible note confirmed

Cuba_BCC_50_PC_2011.00.00_PFX51_FD03_155094_sig
50 pesos convertible, 2011. Like PFX51, but new date, new signature (Ernesto Medina Villaveirán), and prefix FD. The new signature is printed atop the embossed old signature.

Courtesy of Thomas Augustsson.

Cuba new date (2005) 100-peso note confirmed

100 pesos, 2005. Like P129, but new date and prefix AD.

Courtesy of Thomas Augustsson.

Cuba new sig/date (2012) 10-peso convertible note confirmed

10 pesos convertible, 2012. Like PFX49, but new date, new signature (Ernesto Medina Villaveirán), and new prefix DG.

Anyone interested in buying one of these notes can contact the contributor by clicking the link below.

Courtesy of Peter Mosselberger and Orocondor.

Cuba new date (2012) 20-peso note confirmed

Cuba_BCC_20_P_2012.00.00_P122_CM-11_981309_sig
20 pesos, 2012. Like P122, but new date, prefix CM, and new signature.

Courtesy of Filippo Proietti Pannunzi.

Cuba new sig/date (2012) 5-peso convertible note confirmed

Cuba_BCC_5_PC_2012.00.00_PFX48_CG_23_209367_sig
5 pesos convertible, 2012. Like PFX48, but new signature (as of 2011 issue), new date (2012), and new prefix CG.

Courtesy of Claudio Marana.

Cuba new sig/date (2011) 10-peso convertible note confirmed

Cuba_BCC_10_PC_2011.00.00_PFX49_DF_05_451910_sig
10 pesos convertible, 2001. Like PFX49, but new date and new signature.

Notice that the new signature is printed atop the embossing of the preceding signature. This new inked signature atop old embossed signature is also confirmed on 20-peso note dated 2009 and 1-peso convertible note dated 2011.

Courtesy of Thomas Augustsson and Raul Perez Alejo.

Seeking Cuba 20-peso note dated 2003 with CE prefix

Cuba_BCC_20_P_2002.00.00_P118d_CD-30_011584_f
Cuba_BCC_20_P_2002.00.00_P118d_CE-05_545237_f
Cuba_BCC_20_P_2003.00.00_P126_CF-02_532535_f
The prefixes on modern Cuban notes follow a very predicatble system:

All 20-peso notes have a series or prefix consisting of two characters (the first always C) followed by a dash and a two-digit number. When the year changes, the second letter in the prefix advances alphabetically. At least that's how it works for every other denomination, but there's an oddity with the 20-peso note.

From the images above, we can see a 20-peso note dated 2002 (P118) with prefix CD, followed by another 2002 dated note with prefix CE, and finally the commemorative dated 2003 (P126) with prefix CF.

It's possible that there exists a non-commemorative 20-peso note dated 2003 with prefix CE. If anyone can provide scans of same, it would be greatly appreciated.

Courtesy of Thomas Augustsson and David Jones.

Colombia 1,000-peso note does not depict Fidel Castro

742774_pic_970x641
Rumors recently surfaced in a Colombia Reports article dated 2 April 2012 that the back of Colombia’s 1,000-peso (US$0.55) note (Pick 450 and 456)—first issued in 2001—contains an image of Cuba’s former leader, Fidel Castro, as a young student in the crowd behind Colombian presidential candidate Jorge Eliécer Gaitán Ayala. However, in a follow-up article, the banknote’s designer, Jose Antonio Suarez, denies that he inserted Castro into the crowd and insists the likeness is merely a coincidence. According to the article, Banco de la República de Colombia plans to replace the 1,000-peso note with a coin in October.

Courtesy of Christof Zellweger.

Cuba new sig/date (2009) 20-peso note variety confirmed


20 pesos, 2009. Like P122, but new date and signature.

Anyone interested in buying one of these notes can contact the contributor by clicking the link below. Be sure to say you saw it mentioned on BanknoteNews.com.

Courtesy of David Murcek (www.themonetaryunit.com).

Cuba devalues convertible peso to match US dollar

According to a BBC report dated 14 March 2011, Cuba is devaluing the convertible peso by approximately 8% to place it at par with the US dollar in an effort to boost exports and local production, and to make travel to Cuba more affordable to tourists.

Courtesy of Aidan Work.

Cuba new date (2009) 1-peso note confirmed


1 peso, 2009. Like P121, but new date.

Courtesy of Thomas Augustsson.

Cuba new sig/date (2010) 10-peso note confirmed


10 pesos, 2010. Like P117, but new date and new signature.

Courtesy of Thomas Augustsson.

Cuba new 2005 dated 5- and 10-peso convertible notes confirmed




At first glance these two notes appear to be 2005-dated varieties of PFX44 and PFX45 (which are both dated 2004), respectively, but there are additional colors on front, with several items rendered in two tones, and the serial number placement and orientation is new, too.

Courtesy of Thomas Augustsson.

Cuba new date (2009) 10-peso note confirmed


10 pesos (US$10), 2009. Like P117, but new date.

Courtesy of Thomas Augustsson.

Cuba new date (2009) 50-peso note confirmed


50 pesos (US$50), 2009. Like P123, but new date.

Courtesy of Thomas Augustsson.

Cuba new date (2001) 1-peso note confirmed


1 peso (US$1), 2001. Like P121, but new date.

Courtesy of Thomas Augustsson.

Cuba new dates (2007 and 2008) 10-peso forex note confirmed


10 pesos (US$10), 2007 and 2008. Like PFX49, but new dates.

Courtesy of Stein Langørgen.

Cuba new date (2008) 5-peso forex note confirmed


5 pesos (US$5), 2008. Like PFX48, but new date.

Courtesy of Stein Langørgen.

Cuba new date (2007) 1-peso forex note confirmed


1 peso (US$1), 2007. Like PFX46, but new date.

Courtesy of Stein Langørgen.

Cuba new date (2008) 1-peso note confirmed


1 peso (US$1), 2008. Like Pick 121, but new date.

Courtesy of Dr. Manjunath P. Iyer.

Cuba new date (2007) 1-peso note confirmed


1 peso (US$1), 2007. Like Pick 121, but new date, security thread, and Celia Sánchez watermark instead of BCC.

Courtesy of Jarno Komulainen and Frank van Tiel.

Cuba issues new convertible peso series dated 2006

On 18 December 2006, the Banco Central de Cuba issued new convertible peso (CUC) notes. The front of each denomination remains similar to the previous family (Pick FX37 - FX45), which will be gradually withdrawn from circulation. Instead of the national shield which appeared on the backs of all denominations in the previous family, the new notes have individualized backs. Furthermore, an electrotype watermark of the denomination has been added to the watermark portrait of José Martí and BCC appears as a latent image. 150 x 70 mm.


1 convertible peso, 2006. Dark green, tan, and yellow. Monument to José Martí in Havana. Death of José Martí in combat atop horse at Battle of Dos Rios on back.


3 convertible pesos, 2006. Red, pink, and light green. Monument to Ernesto Che Guervara in Santa Clara. Battle of Santa Clara: tank, derailed train, and soldiers with grenade, machine gun, and rifle on back.


5 convertible pesos, 2006. Green, orange, and yellow. Monument to Antonio Maceo in Havana. Protesta de Baraguá: Cuban general Antonio Maceo Grajales and Spanish captain general Arsenio Martínez de Campos y Antón in hammocks on back.


10 convertible pesos, 2006. Brown, blue, and green. Monument to Máximo Gómez in Havana. Revolution Energetica: electric power plant, pick-up truck, and linesman on back.


20 convertible pesos, 2006. Dark blue, light blue, and yellow/green. Monument to Camilo Cienfuegos. Operation Miracle: eye doctors performing surgery and passengers deplaning a jet on back.


50 convertible pesos, 2006. Purple, orange, and yellow. Monument to Calixto García in Havana. Marchers carrying flags and banners that read “Trincheras de Ideas Valen Mas Que Trinchera De Piedra” and “La Batalla de Ideas” on back.


100 convertible pesos, 2006. Red, orange, and bright yellow. Monument to Carlos Manuel de Céspedes. Bolivarian Alternative for the Americas (ALBA): satellite dish, map, woman and man reading, oil refinery on back.

Courtesy of Banco Central de Cuba.

Cuba revised, new date (2006) 20-peso note confirmed


20 pesos, 2006. Like Pick 118 (directly above), but new date, low-vision dots in upper right, and lower serial number now to right of signature, not in border.

Courtesy of Claudio Marana.

Cuba new date (2003) 1-peso note confirmed


A new Cuban 1-peso note has been reported. At first glance, this appears to be just a new date (2003 versus 2002) variety of Pick 121. However, closer examination reveals subtle differences. On the front, the series letters (GD in example above) are green, not red. On the back, the yellow underprint is missing (compare P121 detail above left with that of 2003 issue above right). It is unclear as to whether this is an intentional design change or a printing error. Readers with other examples of the new note are encouraged to share their information.

Courtesy of Frank van Tiel.